Anti Bacterial Soaps: A Common Lie
You have probably watched those TV adverts showing kids rolling in mud. Their overprotective moms squirm over the dirt, but they are confident that their kids will not catch any infections. In fact, sometimes you can’t tell whether the advert is for a detergent or an antiseptic soap. The script runs predictably thereafter: Their moms have entrusted them to this particular anti-bacterial soap that is so potent it kills more germs than bleach. If
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you are still not convinced, some research is then quoted showing how children from homes using antiseptic soaps get ill less often. By the end of the commercial you are determined to change your soap the next time you are shopping. No mom will pass by an opportunity to protect her kids. You, my friend, are the latest victim of an industry hoax.
Anti Bacterial Soaps: A Common Lie
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FDA and EVA
The U.S. Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) just banned 19 chemicals this September 2016 from use in over the counter (OTC) antibacterial soaps. Most antibacterial soaps use triclocarban and triclosan. The latter is an especially controversial antibiotic that is under investigation by both the FDA and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EVA.)
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